When you spin an object around a fixed point, a sling for example, does the obje…

When you spin an object around a fixed point, a sling for example, does the object at the end build up energy that causes it to shoot out quickly when released?

Yes. As you whip the object around on a string, you are doing work on it. You do this by making subtle movements with your hand, exerting forces that aren’t exactly toward the center of the circle. When you do this, the object begins to travel faster and faster, so its kinetic energy increases. Traveling in a circle doesn’t change this kinetic energy because kinetic energy is proportional to speed squared, and doesn’t depend on direction. Finally, when you let go of the string, the object stops circling and begins to travel in a straight line. It carries with it all the kinetic energy you gave it by whipping it about.

Why is the outward force in a loop-the-loop a “fictitious” force? Why isn’t it…

Why is the outward force in a loop-the-loop a “fictitious” force? Why isn’t it a “real” force?

A real force causes acceleration. If the outward “fictitious” force on a circling object were “real,” that object wouldn’t circle. It would accelerate outward. When you swing an object around on a string, you feel the object pulling outward on the string. But it isn’t itself being pulled outward by anything. What you’re feeling is the object’s inertia trying to make it travel straight. The inward force you’re exerting on it isn’t opposing some real force, it’s causing the object to accelerate inward.

Can you explain the term centripetal?

Can you explain the term centripetal?

Centripetal means “directed toward a center.” A centripetal force is a force that’s directed toward a center. For example, a ball swinging around in a circle at the end of a string is experiencing a force toward the center of the circle—a centripetal force. Because the ball accelerates in the direction of the force, it accelerates centripetally. And because it experiences a fictitious force in the direction opposite its acceleration, it experiences an outward fictitious force away from the center of the circle. That fictitious force is called centrifugal “force.” However, you should always recognize that this outward “force” is not a force at all, but an effect caused by the ball’s inertia—its tendency to travel in a straight line.