You said that when you were spinning around in circles, you were actually causin…

You said that when you were spinning around in circles, you were actually causing the earth to move, but it was too tiny a motion to notice. If everyone on the planet got together in one area and started spinning around at exactly the same time and with the same angular velocity, could the effect of the people causing the earth to move be noticed?

I don’t think that it would be possible to detect any change in the earth’s rotation. The earth has a mass of about 6,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 kg, which is about 20,000,000,000,000 times the mass of all the people on earth. The earth’s moment of inertia is even more different than that of the people because much of the earth’s mass is located far from its rotational axis. So if all of the people gathered together and started spinning one way, the effect on the earth would be to make it spin the other way about 1/1,000,000,000,000,000,000 as much. The result might be that the day would change lengths by about a trillionth of a second. (1/1,000,000,000,000 s). That change is less than the natural fluctuations in the earth’s rotation rate, so no one would ever notice. You might find it interesting that the earth’s rotation rate changes slightly with the seasons because of snow in the mountains. When there is lots of snow in the northern hemisphere (during its winter), the earth’s moment of inertia increases just enough to slow its rotation. The day is a tiny bit longer than during our summer. People might be able to duplicate this effect by all climbing to the tops of mountains.

Can you give me an example of when the angular acceleration is in a different di…

Can you give me an example of when the angular acceleration is in a different direction from the torque applied?

When an object isn’t symmetric, it can rotate in very peculiar ways. If you throw a tennis racket into the air so that it is spinning about an axis that isn’t along the handle or at right angles to the handle, it will wobble in flight. Its axis of rotation will actually change with time as it wobbles. If you were to exert a torque on this wobbling tennis racket, its angular acceleration wouldn’t necessarily be along the direction of the torque.

Given a lever long enough, could you move the world?

Given a lever long enough, could you move the world?

Yes. Of course, you would need a fixed pivot about which to work and that might be hard to find. But you could do work on the world with your lever. If the arm you were dealing with was long enough, you could do that work with a small force exerted over a very, very long distance. The lever would then do this work on the world with a very, very large force exerted over a small distance.

How can cats turn their bodies around to land on their feet if they fall and how…

How can cats turn their bodies around to land on their feet if they fall and how can people do tricks in the air when they are skydiving if you’re supposed to “keep doing what you’ve been doing” when you leave the ground?

Cats manage to twist themselves around by exerting torques within their own bodies. They aren’t rigid, so that one half of the cat can exert a torque on the other half and vice versa. Even though the overall cat doesn’t change its rotation, parts of the cat change their individual rotations and the cat manages to reorient itself. It goes from not rotating but upside down to not rotating but right side up. Overall, it never had any angular velocity. As for skydiving, that is mostly a matter of torques from the air. As you fall, the air pushes on you and can exert torques on you about your center of mass. The result is rotation.

Is moment of inertia determined only by mass, as inertia is in translational mot…

Is moment of inertia determined only by mass, as inertia is in translational motion?

No, moment of inertia embodies both mass and its distribution about the axis of rotation. The more of the mass that is located far from the axis of rotation, the larger the moment of inertia. For example, a ball of dough is much easier to spin than a disk-shaped pizza, because the latter has its mass far from the axis of rotation.