How can computer monitors and televisions have images burnt into them over time?

How can computer monitors and televisions have images burnt into them over time?

As the electron beam collides with the phosphor coating on the inside of the picture tube, it slowly damages that phosphor coating. Eventually the phosphors are burnt away and the inside surface of the picture tube stops being uniform. To avoid burning specific regions more than others, computers use screen savers that darken the images by turning down the electron beam and keep those images moving about randomly.

If black is a high current from the television’s radio receiver and white is a l…

If black is a high current from the television’s radio receiver and white is a low current, why do you get a bright spot when you increase the flow of electrons at that instant. Isn’t white a bright spot?

Yes, white is created by a strong flow of electrons. There are two separate circuits here. The current from the receiver section of the television isn’t what is sent through the electron gun. Instead, that current controls the electron gun. When a large current arrives at the electron gun (actually the grid) from the receiver, the flow of electrons toward the screen is pinched off and a dark spot is created. When a small current arrives from the receiver, the electron beam remains intense and a bright spot is created.

How can the magnets be manipulated in such a way that they can do this moving of…

How can the magnets be manipulated in such a way that they can do this moving of the electron beam in such an incredibly small amount of time?

The electromagnets that control the beam are able to turn on and off very quickly. The only limit on the rate at which they can change the magnetic field comes from their inductance. They do resist changes in current passing through them. Fortunately, the television doesn’t move the beam about randomly; it sweeps the beam smoothly. Thus the changes in the current through the electromagnetic coils are also smooth. The television has no trouble ramping the field through the horizontal sweep coils back and forth every 1/15,750th of a second.

If you stand between the two satellites, would you have light on you?

If you stand between the two satellites, would you have light on you?

When two satellites beam their radio waves at you, you are exposed to both of those waves. A normal antenna would not be able to distinguish between them and it would be hard to receive the transmissions of one and not the other. But with a satellite dish, you can easily select the transmissions of one and exclude those of the other. The satellite dish is directional, meaning that it focuses and collects radio waves from a particular direction while ignoring those from other directions. With a satellite dish aimed at a particular satellite, you can receive only transmissions from that satellite.